Consulta de Guías Docentes



Curso : 2019/2020

416 - Degree in English

27806 - Analysis of Literary Texts in English


Información del Plan Docente

Academic Year:
2019/20
Subject:
27806 - Analysis of Literary Texts in English
Faculty / School:
103 -
Degree:
416 - Degree in English
ECTS:
6.0
Year:
1
Semester:
First semester
Subject Type:
Basic Education
Module:
---

1.General information

1.1.Aims of the course

1.2.Context and importance of this course in the degree

1.3.Recommendations to take this course

2.Learning goals

2.1.Competences

2.2.Learning goals

2.3.Importance of learning goals

3.Assessment (1st and 2nd call)

3.1.Assessment tasks (description of tasks, marking system and assessment criteria)

4.Methodology, learning tasks, syllabus and resources

4.1.Methodological overview

See "Learning tasks" and "Syllabus".

More information will be provided on the first day of class.

4.2.Learning tasks

The course includes the following learning tasks:

  • Lectures.
  • Practice sessions.
  • Autonomous work and study.
  • Assessment tasks.

4.3.Syllabus

The course will address the following topics:

Section 1. Poetic discourse

  • 1st session. Defining poetic discourse. The Formalist approach: poetry as deviation and the concept of "defamiliarisation". Literary competence and "naturalisation" in poetry.
    • Reading assignments: "Deviation". In Montgomery et al, eds., Ways of Reading (3rd edition), 2007, London and New York: Routledge, 231-47.
  • 4th session. Poetic rhythm and metre: accentual syllabic metre. Free verse poetry.
    • Reading assignments: "Free Verse". In Jeffrey Wainwright, Poetry: The Basics, 2004, London and New York: Routledge, 85-101.
  • 7th session. Rhetorical tropes: the use and interpretation of figurative language. Other rhetorical figures: Rhyme and sound patterning.
    • Reading assignments: "Figurative Language". In Tom Furniss and Michael Bath, Reading Poetry: An Introduction, 1996, London: Longman, 105-30.
  • 10th session. Verse forms and genres. The limerick; the Italian, English and Romantic sonnet; the popular ballad and the literary ballad.
    • Reading assignment: "Genre" and "The Sonnet". In Tom Furniss and Michael Bath, Reading Poetry: An Introduction, 1996, London: Longman, 255-304.
  • 13th session. Tone and textual strategies: Intertextuality, parody, irony and ambiguity.
    • Reading assignments: "Intertextuality and allusion" and "Irony". In Montgomery et al., eds., Ways of Reading, (3rd edition), 2007, London and New York: Routledge, 156-67 and 131-40.

Section 2. Prose narrative discourse

  • 16th session. Definition of narrative discourse and of narrative text. Levels of analysis: story (fabula) and plot (discourse, sjuzet).
    • Reading assignments: "Narrative and life" and "Defining narrative", in Abbott, H. Porter, The Cambridge Introduction to Narrative. Cambridge: CUP, 2002: 1-23.
  • 19th session. The classical narrative discourse. Causation, linearity and closure.
    • Reading assignments: "Closure", in Abbott, H. Porter, The Cambridge Introduction to Narrative. Cambridge: CUP, 2002: 51-61.
  • 22nd session. Significance and treatment of time in narrative discourse.
  • 25th session. Character and self in narrative: techniques of characterization. Focalization and subjectivity in narrative.
    • Reading assignment: "Character and self in narrative", in Abbott, H. Porter, The Cambridge Introduction to Narrative. Cambridge: CUP, 2002: 123-137.
  • 28th session. Narration: techniques of representation of speech and thought, narrative levels, narrators and narratees, implied authors and implied readers.
    • Reading assignments: "Narration" and "Interpreting Narrative", in Abbott, H. Porter, The Cambridge Introduction to Narrative. Cambridge: CUP, 2002: 62-92; and "Levels: Realms of Existence", in Keen, Suzanne, Narrative Form, Houndmills and New York: Palgrave, 2003: 108-115.

 

REFERENCES

General:

  • Eagleton, Terry, Literary Theory: An Introduction. London: Blackwell, 1996.
  • Peck, John and Martin Coyle, Practical Criticism: How to Write a Critical Appreciation. London: Macmillan, 1995.
  • Pérez Rodríguez, Eva María & José Igor Arranz, Commenting on Texts: Literature, History, The Media. Palma: Universitat de les Illes Balears, 2006.

Poetry:

  • The Norton Anthology of English Literature. Vols. 1 and 2. New York and London: W. W. Norton and Company. (Appendix "Poetic Forms and Literary Terminology"). 1993
  • Barber, Charles. Poetry in English: An Introduction. London: Macmillan. 1983
  • Burton, S. H. The Criticism of Poetry. (2nd edition). London: Longman. 1974
  • Eagleton, Terry. How to Read a Poem. Oxford: Blackwell. 2007
  • Furniss, Tom and Michael Bath, Reading Poetry: An Introduction. London: Harvester Wheatsheaf, 1996.
  • Lynn, Steve. Texts and Contexts. New York: HarperCollins College Publishers. (Chapters 1, 4, 6, 7 and 8). 1994
  • Montgomery, Martin et al. Ways of Reading (3rd Edition). London and New York: Routledge. (Sections 3, 4 and 6). 2007 (1992).
  • Morris, Pam. Literature and Feminism. Oxford and Cambridge: Blackwell. (Part I and Part II, chapter 4). 1992
  • Spurr, Barry. Studying Poetry. Melbourne: Macmillan, 1997.
  • Thorne, Sara. Mastering Poetry. New York and Hampshire: Palgrave Macmillan, 2006
  • Wainwright, Jeffrey. Poetry: The Basics. London and New York: Routledge, 2004.
  • Wolosky, Shira. The Art of Poetry: How to Read a Poem. Oxford: OUP.

Narrative:

  • Abbott, H. Porter. The Cambridge Introduction to Narrative. Cambridge: CUP. 2002.
  • Cobley, Paul. Narrative. London and New York: Routledge. 2001.
  • Cohan, Steven and Linda M. Shires. Telling Stories: A theoretical analysis of narrative fiction. London and New York: Routledge. 1988.
  • Hawthorn, Jeremy. Studying the Novel: An Introduction. London: Arnold. 1997.
  • Keen, Suzanne. Narrative Form. Houndmills and New York: Palgrave. 2003.
  • Lowe, N. J. The Classical Plot and the Invention of Western Narrative. Cambridge: CUP. 2000.
  • McQuillan, Martin (ed.). The Narrative Reader. London and New York: Routledge. 2000.
  • Toolan, Michael. Narrative: a critical linguistic introduction (2nd edition). London and New York: Routledge.

4.4.Course planning and calendar

Further information concerning the timetable, classroom, office hours, assessment dates and other details regarding this course, will be provided on the first day of class or please refer to the Faculty of Philosophy and Arts website (academic calendar http://academico.unizar.es/calendario-academico/calendario, timetable https://fyl.unizar.es/horario-de-clases#overlay-context=horario-de-clases; assessment dates: https://fyl.unizar.es/calendario-de-examenes#overlay-context=) 

4.5.Bibliography and recommended resources


Curso : 2019/2020

416 - Degree in English

27806 - Analysis of Literary Texts in English


Información del Plan Docente

Academic Year:
2019/20
Subject:
27806 - Analysis of Literary Texts in English
Faculty / School:
103 -
Degree:
416 - Degree in English
ECTS:
6.0
Year:
1
Semester:
First semester
Subject Type:
Basic Education
Module:
---

1.General information

1.1.Aims of the course

1.2.Context and importance of this course in the degree

1.3.Recommendations to take this course

2.Learning goals

2.1.Competences

2.2.Learning goals

2.3.Importance of learning goals

3.Assessment (1st and 2nd call)

3.1.Assessment tasks (description of tasks, marking system and assessment criteria)

4.Methodology, learning tasks, syllabus and resources

4.1.Methodological overview

See "Learning tasks" and "Syllabus".

More information will be provided on the first day of class.

4.2.Learning tasks

The course includes the following learning tasks:

  • Lectures.
  • Practice sessions.
  • Autonomous work and study.
  • Assessment tasks.

4.3.Syllabus

The course will address the following topics:

Section 1. Poetic discourse

  • 1st session. Defining poetic discourse. The Formalist approach: poetry as deviation and the concept of "defamiliarisation". Literary competence and "naturalisation" in poetry.
    • Reading assignments: "Deviation". In Montgomery et al, eds., Ways of Reading (3rd edition), 2007, London and New York: Routledge, 231-47.
  • 4th session. Poetic rhythm and metre: accentual syllabic metre. Free verse poetry.
    • Reading assignments: "Free Verse". In Jeffrey Wainwright, Poetry: The Basics, 2004, London and New York: Routledge, 85-101.
  • 7th session. Rhetorical tropes: the use and interpretation of figurative language. Other rhetorical figures: Rhyme and sound patterning.
    • Reading assignments: "Figurative Language". In Tom Furniss and Michael Bath, Reading Poetry: An Introduction, 1996, London: Longman, 105-30.
  • 10th session. Verse forms and genres. The limerick; the Italian, English and Romantic sonnet; the popular ballad and the literary ballad.
    • Reading assignment: "Genre" and "The Sonnet". In Tom Furniss and Michael Bath, Reading Poetry: An Introduction, 1996, London: Longman, 255-304.
  • 13th session. Tone and textual strategies: Intertextuality, parody, irony and ambiguity.
    • Reading assignments: "Intertextuality and allusion" and "Irony". In Montgomery et al., eds., Ways of Reading, (3rd edition), 2007, London and New York: Routledge, 156-67 and 131-40.

Section 2. Prose narrative discourse

  • 16th session. Definition of narrative discourse and of narrative text. Levels of analysis: story (fabula) and plot (discourse, sjuzet).
    • Reading assignments: "Narrative and life" and "Defining narrative", in Abbott, H. Porter, The Cambridge Introduction to Narrative. Cambridge: CUP, 2002: 1-23.
  • 19th session. The classical narrative discourse. Causation, linearity and closure.
    • Reading assignments: "Closure", in Abbott, H. Porter, The Cambridge Introduction to Narrative. Cambridge: CUP, 2002: 51-61.
  • 22nd session. Significance and treatment of time in narrative discourse.
  • 25th session. Character and self in narrative: techniques of characterization. Focalization and subjectivity in narrative.
    • Reading assignment: "Character and self in narrative", in Abbott, H. Porter, The Cambridge Introduction to Narrative. Cambridge: CUP, 2002: 123-137.
  • 28th session. Narration: techniques of representation of speech and thought, narrative levels, narrators and narratees, implied authors and implied readers.
    • Reading assignments: "Narration" and "Interpreting Narrative", in Abbott, H. Porter, The Cambridge Introduction to Narrative. Cambridge: CUP, 2002: 62-92; and "Levels: Realms of Existence", in Keen, Suzanne, Narrative Form, Houndmills and New York: Palgrave, 2003: 108-115.

 

REFERENCES

General:

  • Eagleton, Terry, Literary Theory: An Introduction. London: Blackwell, 1996.
  • Peck, John and Martin Coyle, Practical Criticism: How to Write a Critical Appreciation. London: Macmillan, 1995.
  • Pérez Rodríguez, Eva María & José Igor Arranz, Commenting on Texts: Literature, History, The Media. Palma: Universitat de les Illes Balears, 2006.

Poetry:

  • The Norton Anthology of English Literature. Vols. 1 and 2. New York and London: W. W. Norton and Company. (Appendix "Poetic Forms and Literary Terminology"). 1993
  • Barber, Charles. Poetry in English: An Introduction. London: Macmillan. 1983
  • Burton, S. H. The Criticism of Poetry. (2nd edition). London: Longman. 1974
  • Eagleton, Terry. How to Read a Poem. Oxford: Blackwell. 2007
  • Furniss, Tom and Michael Bath, Reading Poetry: An Introduction. London: Harvester Wheatsheaf, 1996.
  • Lynn, Steve. Texts and Contexts. New York: HarperCollins College Publishers. (Chapters 1, 4, 6, 7 and 8). 1994
  • Montgomery, Martin et al. Ways of Reading (3rd Edition). London and New York: Routledge. (Sections 3, 4 and 6). 2007 (1992).
  • Morris, Pam. Literature and Feminism. Oxford and Cambridge: Blackwell. (Part I and Part II, chapter 4). 1992
  • Spurr, Barry. Studying Poetry. Melbourne: Macmillan, 1997.
  • Thorne, Sara. Mastering Poetry. New York and Hampshire: Palgrave Macmillan, 2006
  • Wainwright, Jeffrey. Poetry: The Basics. London and New York: Routledge, 2004.
  • Wolosky, Shira. The Art of Poetry: How to Read a Poem. Oxford: OUP.

Narrative:

  • Abbott, H. Porter. The Cambridge Introduction to Narrative. Cambridge: CUP. 2002.
  • Cobley, Paul. Narrative. London and New York: Routledge. 2001.
  • Cohan, Steven and Linda M. Shires. Telling Stories: A theoretical analysis of narrative fiction. London and New York: Routledge. 1988.
  • Hawthorn, Jeremy. Studying the Novel: An Introduction. London: Arnold. 1997.
  • Keen, Suzanne. Narrative Form. Houndmills and New York: Palgrave. 2003.
  • Lowe, N. J. The Classical Plot and the Invention of Western Narrative. Cambridge: CUP. 2000.
  • McQuillan, Martin (ed.). The Narrative Reader. London and New York: Routledge. 2000.
  • Toolan, Michael. Narrative: a critical linguistic introduction (2nd edition). London and New York: Routledge.

4.4.Course planning and calendar

Further information concerning the timetable, classroom, office hours, assessment dates and other details regarding this course, will be provided on the first day of class or please refer to the Faculty of Philosophy and Arts website (academic calendar http://academico.unizar.es/calendario-academico/calendario, timetable https://fyl.unizar.es/horario-de-clases#overlay-context=horario-de-clases; assessment dates: https://fyl.unizar.es/calendario-de-examenes#overlay-context=) 

4.5.Bibliography and recommended resources