Syllabus query



Academic Year/course: 2021/22

525 - Master's in Economics

61334 - Econometrics and Mathematical Instruments


Syllabus Information

Academic Year:
2021/22
Subject:
61334 - Econometrics and Mathematical Instruments
Faculty / School:
109 - Facultad de Economía y Empresa
Degree:
525 - Master's in Economics
ECTS:
6.0
Year:
1
Semester:
First semester
Subject Type:
Compulsory
Module:
---

1. General information

2. Learning goals

3. Assessment (1st and 2nd call)

3.1. Assessment tasks (description of tasks, marking system and assessment criteria)

Course assessment will be onsite. In the case of a new pandemic wave assessment will become partly online or fully online. It should be noted that in any online assessment task the student performance may be recorded, following the regulations described in: “https://protecciondatos.unizar.es/sites/protecciondatos.unizar.es/files/users/lopd/gdocencia_reducida.pdf”_

4. Methodology, learning tasks, syllabus and resources

4.1. Methodological overview

The methodology followed in this course is oriented towards achievement of the learning objectives. It is based on:

  • Lectures and subsequent discussion between professor and students.
  • Individual and voluntary assignments about open questions presented in class.

Therefore, the learning process is a mixture of lectures, done by the teacher, and the active participation of students on the different topics of the course. Moreover, students should do small presentations in class, summaries about proposed readings, and exercises suggested by the teacher. Computer resources are used in lectures and presentations.

 

All lectures and seminars will be imparted on site. In the case of a new health emergency caused by the current pandemic all teaching will be moved online.

4.2. Learning tasks

The course includes the following learning tasks: 

  • Lectures (40 hours): compulsory attendance.
  • Autonomous work (90 hours).
  • Discussion and presentation of a final report (20 hours): compulsory attendance. The defense of the report will take place at the end of the course.
  • Presentation and discussion, at the end of the course, of a significant collection of problems and exercises.
  • Assessment: continuous assessment system, or students who wish it have the opportunity to take a global final exam.

4.3. Syllabus

The course will address the following topics:

SECTION I. ADVANCED MATHEMATICAL INSTRUMENTS IN ECONOMIC ANALYSIS

Topic 1:  MATHEMATICAL PROGRAMMING

1.1 Inequality constraints programs.

1.2 Kuhn-Tucker conditions.

1.3 Global optimality conditions.

1.4 Economic Analysis Applications.

Topic 2. OPTIMAL CONTROL THEORY

2.1 Hamiltonian. The Pontryagin maximun principle.

2.2 Dynamic programming.

2.3 Economic Applications.

Topic 3. MILLENNIUM PROBLEMS

3.1 The input-output framework.

3.2 Other Economic Analysis Applications.

 

SECTION II. ECONOMETRICS

            Topic 1. INSTRUMENTS

                  1.1 Asymptotic results.

                  1.2 Maximum likelihood method.

                  1.3 LR, LM and Wald tests.

                  1.4 Introduction to the R program.

           Topic 2. CROSS-SECTION DATA:

                  2.1 The General Linear Model:       

                       2.1.1 Hypotheses, estimation, validation and prediction.

                       2.1.2 Endogenous regressors and instrumental variables estimation.

                       2.1.3 Application in R

                 2.2 Discrete response models:

                       2.2.1 Binary dependent variable. Logit and Probit models.

                       2.2.2 Multinomial models and ordered discrete choice models.

                       2.2.3 Application in R.             

          Topic 3. TIME SERIES DATA

                 3.1 Stationary variables: Single-equation and multi-equation models.

                 3.2 Non-stationary variable models: Unit root and cointegration tests.

                 3.3 Non-linear models: ARCH, GARCH and TAR.

                 3.4 Applications in R.

         Topic 4. PANEL DATA

                 4.1. Data pool model.

                 4.2. Fixed effects model.

           4.3. Random effects model

           4.4. Application in R

 

 

          

 

4.4. Course planning and calendar

The course starts in the second half of October and ends in late January, with an approximate duration of 15 weeks. The contents will be explained according to the syllabus. Each topic will take approximately 2 weeks. There will be presentations of assignments throughout the whole period, but these presentations will take place especially at the end of the course.

 

4.5. Bibliography and recommended resources

Part 1

  • Alpha C. Chiang (1992). Dinamical optimization. McGraw-Hill
  • Mauricio Bruglieri, Mathias Ehrgott, Horst W. Hamacher, Francesco Maffioli (2006). An annotated bibliography of combinatorial problems with fixed cardinality constraints. Discrete Appied Mathematics 154, 1344-1357.
  • De la Fuente, A. (2000). Mathematical methods and models for economists. Cambridge University Press
  • Fernández Pérez, C.; Vázquez Hernández, F.J.; Vegas Montaner, J.M. (2003). Ecuaciones diferenciales y en diferencias. Sistemas dinámicos. Thompson
  • Kurz, H.D.; Salvador, N. (1995): Theory of Production. A long-Period Analysis. Cambridge University Press
  • Lawrence Blume, David Easly, Jon Kleinberg, Éva Tardos (2015). Introduction to computer and economic theory. Journal of Economic Theory 156, 1-13.
  • Mas Colell, A.; Whinston, M.; Green, J. (1995). Microeconomic theory. Oxford University Press
  • Ronald E. Mickens (2015). Difference equations, theory, applications and advanced topics. Third Edition. CRC Press.
  • Miller, R.E.; Blair, P.D. (1985). Input-output  analysis,  foundations and extensions. Printice Hall
  • Nikaido, H. (1978). Métodos matemáticos del análisis económico moderno. Vicens Vives
  • Shone, R. (2002):  Economic Dynamics. Cambridge University Press, 2nd edition
  • Takayama A. (1990). Mathematical economics. Cambridge University Press, 2nd edition
  • Vegara, J. (1979): Economía política y modelos multisectoriales. Tecnos

Part 2

  • Hill, R. C., Griffits, W.E. y Lim, G.C. Principles of econometrics. NJ Wiley, 2012.
  • Martin, V., Hurn, S. y Harris, S.  Econometric modelling with time series. Cambridge University Press, New York  2013.
  • Enders, W. Applied econometric time series. Wiley, New York 1995
  • Greene, W. H. Análisis econométrico. (6ª ed)Pearson International Edition 2008.
  • Hayashi, F. Econometrics. Princeton University Press, Princeton, New Jersey 2000.
  • Stock, J.H. y Watson, M. M. Introducción a la Econometría. Pearson, Madrid 2012.
  • Wooldridge, J.M. Econometric analysis of cross section and panel data. MIT, 2010.
  • Wooldridge, J.M. Introducción a la Econometría. Thomson, 2001.

 


Curso Académico: 2021/22

525 - Máster Universitario en Economía

61334 - Econometría e instrumentos matemáticos


Información del Plan Docente

Año académico:
2021/22
Asignatura:
61334 - Econometría e instrumentos matemáticos
Centro académico:
109 - Facultad de Economía y Empresa
Titulación:
525 - Máster Universitario en Economía
Créditos:
6.0
Curso:
1
Periodo de impartición:
Primer semestre
Clase de asignatura:
Obligatoria
Materia:
---

1. Información Básica

1.1. Objetivos de la asignatura

La asignatura y sus resultados previstos responden a los siguientes planteamientos y objetivos:

Que el alumno conozca las técnicas matemáticas y econométricas que se emplean en economía avanzada y así pueda comprender y discutir con rigor las hipótesis y desarrollos que aparecen en los distintos modelos económicos. Se busca también que el alumno se familiarice con la resolución y representación, vía ordenador, de modelos económicos, ya sean estáticos o dinámicos.  Uno de los objetivos es que el alumno sea capaz de “cuantificar” las relaciones económicas. “Cuantificar” significa saber modelizar hipótesis sobre los fenómenos que se estudian; saber encontrar y tratar los datos relacionados con los conceptos modelizados;  significa saber aplicar los mejores estimadores a los escenarios que resultan; significa también  saber qué procedimientos utilizar para contrastar determinadas restricciones y la validez general del modelo y, por último, significa  saber extraer información útil (causalidad y predicción) del modelo estimado y contrastado. 

La asignatura y sus resultados previstos responden a los siguientes planteamientos y objetivos:

Capacidad para comprender, reproducir y construir modelos

Comprender, analizar y resolver problemas complejos de carácter económico a partir de un conocimiento amplio de modelos avanzados del análisis económico.

La capacidad de uso de paquetes informáticos para la estimación de modelos con datos de carácter individual y/o agregado.

Demostrar que se conocen los temas de investigación relevantes y los debates académicos actuales en el ámbito de la economía aplicada, historia económica, métodos estadísticos y cuantitativos y el análisis económico, relacionando las diferentes aportaciones disciplinares que pueden dar origen a nuevos enfoques.

Ser capaz de analizar situaciones dinámicas a través de ecuaciones diferenciales y en diferencias, así como aplicar lo anterior a los problemas de control óptimo

Conocer y comprender el Marco input-output, los Modelos de Equilibrio General Aplicado y la optimización dinámica, aplicándolo al análisis de impactos económicos y medioambientales

Ser capaz de utilizar funciones, instrumentos y nociones matemáticas avanzadas (preferencias, topología, convexidad, la teoría de correspondencias y sus concreciones) para representar los patrones de conducta de los agentes económicos y su comportamiento racional en el marco de la teoría del equilibrio general.

Fundamentar desde la Teoría Econométrica nuevos instrumentos para diferentes tipos de datos.

Estos planteamientos y objetivos están alineados con muchos de los Objetivos de Desarrollo Sostenible (ODS) de la Agenda 2030 de Naciones Unidas (https://www.un.org/sustainabledevelopment/es/), de tal manera que la adquisición de los resultados de aprendizaje de la asignatura proporciona capacitación y competencia para contribuir en cierta medida a su logro.

1.2. Contexto y sentido de la asignatura en la titulación

La asignatura se engloba dentro del conjunto de materias que se ofrecen en el Master Universitario en Investigación en Economía. Este master está incluído dentro del Programa de Doctorado en Economía que se imparte en la Facultad de Economía y Empresa y que ha sido distinguido con la Mención de Calidad por parte del Ministerio de Educación. Se trata de una asignatura optativa de seis créditos que sirve de soporte teórico a otras disciplinas de economía, también impartidas en el master, en especial a la microeconomía y a la macroeconomía.

Por su contenido econométrico y matemático la asignatura resulta de gran utilidad en la formulación y modelización de problemas económicos tanto en su aspecto axiomático como en los que se requiere un análisis cuantitativo detallado.

 

1.3. Recomendaciones para cursar la asignatura

Aunque el curso tiene carácter autocontenido, el alumno debería tener, al menos, una formación mínima equivalente a la de haber superado 12 créditos en Matemáticas, Econometría y Teoría económica.

 

Lo ideal sería que tuviera conocimiento de los instrumentos matemáticos y econométricos básicos adquiridos por un graduado (licenciado)  de cualquiera de los grados (licenciaturas) que se imparten (impartían)  en la facultad de Economía y Empresa (o la antigua Facultad de CC.EE. y EE.) de la Universidad de Zaragoza.

 

Igualmente sería muy útil que tuviera un dominio básico del SPSS de Gretl  y de Mathematica o MatLab.

 

2. Competencias y resultados de aprendizaje

2.1. Competencias

Al superar la asignatura, el estudiante será más competente para...

Trabajar en el ámbito formal de la economía e iniciarse a la investigación dentro de este campo. La superación de los contenidos del curso le facilitará la lectura crítica de textos y artículos de investigación. 

Será también capaz de analizar y sintetizar grandes y complejas cantidades de información cuantitativa y cualitativa utilizando técnicas matemáticas, estadísticas y econométricas.

2.2. Resultados de aprendizaje

El estudiante, para superar la asignatura, deberá demostrar:

Conocer el lenguaje matemático formal y argumentar de forma precisa. En concreto, con la superación de la asignatura será capaz de seguir una demostración lógica y adquirirá destrezas para resolver problemas teóricos. Como consecuencia natural derivada de este aprendizaje cabe destacar que las habilidades adquiridas le facilitarán la lectura de artículos de investigación.

Conocimiento de las nociones y conceptos matemáticos y de los instrumentos estadísticos y econométricos que permiten analizar el comportamiento racional de los agentes económicos. En concreto, ecuaciones diferenciales y en diferencias, optimización dinámica, análisis input-output, preferencias individuales y colectivas, convexidad, teoría de correspondencias, el modelo lineal general, series temporales y modelos microeconométricos, mostrando destreza en el uso de paquetes informáticos.

2.3. Importancia de los resultados de aprendizaje

Además de los aspectos formativos generales que ofrece el curso, su contenido es importante porque facilita el estudio riguroso de modelos económicos avanzados. En concreto, permitirá profundizar en algunos de los paradigmas clásicos de la economía como la teoría del equilibrio general, la teoría de la elección social, el análisis del bienestar, la teoría del crecimiento óptimo, asignación de recursos naturales, etc..

Por otra parte, los contenidos del curso hacen posible al alumno: 

  • Aplicar correctamente tanto los instrumentos ya adquiridos como los nuevos desarrollados en este curso.
  • Optimización dinámica con el software de Mathematica.
  • Comprender y ser capaz de explotar para la investigación y la información económica el Marco input-output y los MEGA.
  • Ser capaz de plantear la modelización econométrica adecuada dependiendo del tipo de datos disponibles.
  • Manejar herramientas de software econométrico como Gretl y R.

3. Evaluación

3.1. Tipo de pruebas y su valor sobre la nota final y criterios de evaluación para cada prueba

El estudiante deberá demostrar que ha alcanzado los resultados de aprendizaje previstos mediante las siguientes actividades de evaluacion

La evaluación se efectuará a partir de los trabajos entregados. El contenido requerido en estos trabajos será detallado por los profesores a lo largo del periodo lectivo. La prueba global única para la calificación de la asignatura a la que, según la normativa vigente, el estudiante tiene derecho, se realizará de acuerdo al calendario académico aprobado para el curso 2021-2022.

El estudiante deberá demostrar que ha alcanzado los resultados de aprendizaje previstos mediante las siguientes actividades de evaluación:

 

Parte 1 del programa

Parte 2 del programa

Trabajos realizados y participación en las clases

50%

50%

Examen global

50%

50%

 

Nota: Está previsto que la evaluación se realice de manera presencial pero si las circunstancias sanitarias lo requieren, se realizará de manera semipresencial u online

4. Metodología, actividades de aprendizaje, programa y recursos

4.1. Presentación metodológica general

El proceso de aprendizaje se basa en la resolución por parte del estudiante de problemas planteados en clase utilizando entre otros, los recursos informáticos vistos en clase.

 

Está previsto que las clases sean presenciales. No obstante, si fuese necesario por razones sanitarias, las clases podrán impartirse de forma semipresencial u online.

4.2. Actividades de aprendizaje

Las actividades que siguen permitirán a los estudiantes alcanzar lso resultados esperados y superar el curso.

1: Evaluación continua.
2: Entrega de los trabajos solicitados.
3: Examen final global para los estudiantes que lo deseen.

Este es el esquema general de estudio y aprendizaje que se asume en el curso

Actividades

Nº Horas

% Presencialidad

 Clases teóricas

60

100%

 Trabajo individual y estudio

90

--------

 

4.3. Programa

 

PARTE1. INSTRUMENTOS MATEMÁTICOS AVANZADOS PARA EL ANÁLISIS ECONÓMICO

1. PROGRAMACIÓN MATEMÁTICA:

1.1  Problemas con restricciones de desigualdad.

1.2  Condiciones necesarias de optimalidad local. Condiciones de Kuhn-Tucker.

1.3  Condiciones de optimalidad global.

1.4  Aplicaciones al Análisis Económico.

2.TEORÍA DEL CONTROL ÓPTIMO:

2.1  Hamiltoniano. El principio del máximo de Pontryagin.

2.2  Programación Dinámica.

2.3  Aplicaciones al Análisis Económico.

3.PROBLEMAS DEL MILENIO. BIG DATA:

3.1  Tablas input-output.

3.2  Otras aplicaciones al Análisis Económico.

 

PARTE 2. ECONOMETRIA

   

1. INSTRUMENTOS:

         1.1 Resultados asintóticos.

         1.2 Método de máxima verosimilitud.

         1.3 Contrastes LR, LM y Wald.

         1.4 Introducción al programa R.

2. DATOS DE SECCIÓN CRUZADA:

         2.1 El modelo lineal general:

              2.1.1 Hipótesis, estimación chequeo y producción.

              2.1.2 Regresores endógenos y estimación con variables instrumentales.

              2.1.3 Aplicación en R.

         2.2 Variable dependiente discreta:

              2.2.1 Variable dependiente binaria. Modelos Logit y Probit

              2.2.2 Modelos multinomiales y Modelos de elección discreta ordenada.

              2.2.3 Aplicación en R.

3. DATOS DE SERIES TEMPORALES:

           3.1 Modelos de variables estacionarias: uniecuacionales y multiecuacionales.

           3.2 Modelos de variables no estacionarias: Contrastes de raíz unitaria y cointegración.

           3.3 Modelos no lineales: ARCH, GARCH y TAR.

           3:4 Aplicaciones en R.

4. DATOS DE PANEL:

           4.1 Modelos de pool de datos.

           4.2 Modelo de efectos fijos.

           4.3 Modelos de efectos aleatorios.

           4.4 Aplicación a R.

4.4. Planificación de las actividades de aprendizaje y calendario de fechas clave

El curso se inicia en la segunda mitad de octubre y finaliza a finales de enero, teniendo una duración aproximada de 15 semanas. Los contenidos del programa tendrán un desarrollo temporal similar al orden seguido en el programa. Cada tema tendrá una duración cercana a las dos semanas. Se harán presentaciones de trabajos a lo largo de todo el periodo lectivo, aunque estas tendrán lugar sobre todo al final del curso.

Las fechas de los exámenes finales serán al final del periodo lectivo y serán fijadas por la propia Facultad de acuerdo con la legislación vigente.

4.5. Bibliografía y recursos recomendados

Parte 1

  • Alpha C. Chiang (1992). Dinamical optimization. McGraw-Hill
  • Mauricio Bruglieri, Mathias Ehrgott, Horst W. Hamacher, Francesco Maffioli (2006). An annotated bibliography of combinatorial problems with fixed cardinality constraints. Discrete Appied Mathematics 154, 1344-1357.
  • De la Fuente, A. (2000). Mathematical methods and models for economists. Cambridge University Press
  • Fernández Pérez, C.; Vázquez Hernández, F.J.; Vegas Montaner, J.M. (2003). Ecuaciones diferenciales y en diferencias. Sistemas dinámicos. Thompson
  • Kurz, H.D.; Salvador, N. (1995): Theory of Production. A long-Period Analysis. Cambridge University Press
  • Lawrence Blume, David Easly, Jon Kleinberg, Éva Tardos (2015). Introduction to computer and economic theory. Journal of Economic Theory 156, 1-13.
  • Mas Colell, A.; Whinston, M.; Green, J. (1995). Microeconomic theory. Oxford University Press
  • Ronald E. Mickens (2015). Difference equations, theory, applications and advanced topics. Third Edition. CRC Press.
  • Miller, R.E.; Blair, P.D. (1985). Input-output  analysis,  foundations and extensions. Printice Hall
  • Nikaido, H. (1978). Métodos matemáticos del análisis económico moderno. Vicens Vives
  • Shone, R. (2002):  Economic Dynamics. Cambridge University Press, 2nd edition
  • Takayama A. (1990). Mathematical economics. Cambridge University Press, 2nd edition
  • Vegara, J. (1979): Economía política y modelos multisectoriales. Tecnos

Parte 2

  • Hill, R. C., Griffits, W.E. y Lim, G.C. Principles of econometrics. NJ Wiley, 2012.
  • Martin, V., Hurn, S. y Harris, S.  Econometric modelling with time series. Cambridge University Press, New York  2013.
  • Enders, W. Applied econometric time series. Wiley, New York 1995
  • Greene, W. H. Análisis econométrico. (6ª ed)Pearson International Edition 2008.
  • Hayashi, F. Econometrics. Princeton University Press, Princeton, New Jersey 2000.
  • Stock, J.H. y Watson, M. M. Introducción a la Econometría. Pearson, Madrid 2012.
  • Wooldridge, J.M. Econometric analysis of cross section and panel data. MIT, 2010.
  • Wooldridge, J.M. Introducción a la Econometría. Thomson, 2001.